San Francisco is Replacing Its Trash Cans. The New Ones Cost $20,000 a Pop.

San Francisco wants to replace the city's 3,000 trash cans with fancy new bins that currently cost $20,000 a piece. The jaw-dropping price is bringing new meaning to the term “taxpayer waste.”

A resident who spoke to the local CBS affiliate called the plan “insane.” County Supervisor Matt Haney agrees.

“$20,000 a can is ridiculous,” he said.

Nevertheless, a Board of Supervisors committee has approved a proposal to manufacture 15 prototypes for testing.

The city’s existing cans were purchased in the 1990s and actually bear a link to the Public Works corruption scandal involving Mohammed Nuru. As the homeless crisis has spiraled out of control, the archaic bins have become a problem.

“They go looking for drugs. They go looking for things to recycle. In the neighborhood I live in, they bust them open, pull things out. Sometimes they get too full,” San Francisco resident Isaac Stevens told CBS.

The new prototype contains sensors that will alert sanitation workers when a bin is getting full. They would be more tamper-resistant and secure from rodents. The department also claims the cost per bin should drop to around $4,000 once they're being mass produced. That would be a major improvement, though still pricey for literal trash. 

See the designs here


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